Cinema memories

They were poor when they were small.  She had never known her father and his disappeared when he was two years old.  Their mother changed lovers like other women changed shoes and they were often left alone to fend for themselves.

Occasionally the mother gave them a little money to buy sweets but they saved it up to indulge in their passion – cinema.  Once they had enough coins for both of them, they would go to the cinema house and buy tickets for any films they were allowed to watch.  In those days they were able to watch some of the Hollywood classics and to this day, many decades later, she remembers the actors and the movies she watched.   Those are the sweetest memories from her childhood, when her brother and her were close and took care of each other.

When she became cumbersome to their mother she was sent into service as a live in maid.  Her brother hanged around the streets during the day.  At night he slept wrapped in a blanket on an small, old mattress on the floor, while the mother pandered to her latest man.

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This week’s FWF prompt from Kellie Elmore is a word bank:

blanket – falsetto – cumbersome – cinema – coins

You may use one or all of the words. Don’t force it. If only one speaks to you, that is your muse. Go with it. If you can use all of them with little effort (no overthinking it) then let it flow. I look forward to reading you.

 free write friday kellie elmore

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9 thoughts on “Cinema memories

  1. A sad tale, but these sort of stories are out there, and they do exist within and about society where it pushes peoples’ to cultural fringes of existance. Your words have a strong poetic feel to them at the start, and may even transform well into lyrics for a song. The story felt so connected to its moments, liked it a lot.

  2. I agree with Sean. It’s sad that these stories exist in real life. That people struggle as they do. A shame really, especially in a country that is supposed to be wealthy and we still have people on the streets.
    Great work with evoking emotion. Nice work.
    Thank you for writing for FWF.

    • I agree too, it is terribly sad to know that this kind of thing happens everywhere, regardless of the culture or wealth of a country. Thank you for your comment and encouragement, Kellie.

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